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The Physics of Rock Climbing!

7 May
Professor Kung explains the physics of rock climbing...

Professor Kung explains the physics of rock climbing…

The following post is written by UHPer and SPA member Kerry Lanzo —

My freshman year in the UHP, Professor Kung taught me Einstein’s theory of relativity. On Saturday, she revealed a different talent to four UHPers for a thrilling new type of professorial experience: rock climbing. Through three hours of Professor Kung’s (and company’s) patient belaying, there was a lot of falling, forearm fatigue, awkward bending (or stretching), and in some cases, muscular challenges that most classes in the UHP don’t require. We learned that some hand-holds really are not as nice as they look, and when in doubt, to forget the color of the course you are trying to follow and just grab anything you can that looks friendly to finish the wall. But it was worth the pain for some great photo ops from the top of the wall, a run-in with the Death Staror an end-of-the-day treat of Girl Scout Cookies and the chance to see our very own professor make a 5.10b course look easy.

More pics below.  Continue reading

Live Life on the (L)edge!

22 Apr

rockclimbing

Professor Kung is taking a lucky group of UHP-ers ROCK-CLIMBING at Earth Treks in Rockville, Maryland on Saturday, May 4!

Don’t worry, you’ll still have time to study. Kerry Lanzo will be leading a group from the Townhouse in Foggy Bottom at 10am, to return by 1:30pm, and you can leave early if you need (it’s right up the red line). The cost is $22 for entry for the day, and $11 for the materials. It’ll be well worth it to get some exercise, de-stress, and hang out with one of UHP’s coolest faculty members.

To RSVP, please send an e-mail to the uhp@gwu.edu account. The group will most likely cap at 5 or 6 to keep it small, but we’re flexible!

Summer Opportunity – Study with Professor Shepherd in China!

5 Dec

Interested in doing something unique, exciting, and educational this summer? Check out this opportunity from the Elliott School and UHP Professor Robert Shepherd:

Summer Field Program:
Heritage, Tourism, and Development on China’s Ethnic Frontiers
June 10th – July 1st, 2012

This program takes GW students into the field to experience firsthand the development
challenges faced by state authorities, community leaders, and regular citizens in the
interior regions of the People’s Republic of China. As part of a national campaign
to ‘Go West’, Chinese authorities have promoted tourism and heritage projects as
development tools in marginalized minority areas. The purpose of this program is to
learn about these projects and their impact on citizens by traveling overland through
the Tibetan cultural frontier area of historic Amdo and Kham.

After arriving in China we will spend five days in Beijing, where we will visit cultural
sites in and around the city such as the Temple of Heaven, the Forbidden City, and
the Dongtian Daoist Temple complex. During this time we will also visit the National
Minorities University for a discussion of state ethnic policies, and Beijing International
Studies University, for a discussion on tourism policies and objectives. After traveling by
train to Lanzhou, capital of Gansu Province in Northwest China, we will travel overland
through the Amdo and Kham regions of historic Tibet. Our first stop will be the Tibetan
pilgrimage town of Xiahe, site of Labrang Monastery, a key intellectual center for the
Gelukpa Sect of Tibetan Buddhism. We will then continue by road to the monastery
town of Taksen Lhamo (Chinese Langmusi), located along the Gansu-Sichuan border
on the edge of the Tibetan plateau, and then to Jiuzhaigou National Park, in Northern
Sichuan province. From Jiuzhaigou we will fly to Xian, the former capital of the Tang
Dynasty and site of the Terra-Cotta warrior museum. Our trip will conclude with a return
journey to Beijing by train.

Over the course of this three-week field study students will interact with Chinese
tourism and heritage scholars, local Tibetan and Han Chinese business owners, Tibetan
pilgrims and nomads, and Chinese students. In keeping with the focus of the program,
our overland trip will be arranged and hosted by Nomad Travel, a Tibetan-run agency
located in Xiahe, Gansu province.

The total fee for this program is $5,432.This includes GWU tuition ($3,679) for three
credits), train (soft sleeper class) and air travel within China, all accommodations, site
visits, admission fees, travel insurance and most meals. Parts of this journey will be at
elevations of 3,000 to 3,500 meters (10,000-12,000 feet), so good health is a must.

The program will be led by Robert Shepherd, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and
International Affairs. For more information, feel free to email him at rshepher@gwu.edu
or stop by his office in the Sigur Center for Asian Studies, Suite 503, 1957 E Street.

Are Satellites Attacking the Earth? [Prof. Kung says…]

12 Oct

After hearing some news reports that yet another satellite was going to crash somewhere on our big blue planet, I had a few questions that only our very own Prof.  Kung could answer — I happen to know for a fact that there are satellites out there that send text messages to her (no joke), so I thought she might have the inside scoop.

I wanted to know why satellites were attacking the earth and what we could do about it.  Keep reading to find out the answers to these burning questions.

Continue reading

Recommended Event: Staged Reading of Vanishing Point

31 Aug

Join Horizons Theatre for a free staged reading, as part of the Page-to-Stage Festival at the Kennedy Center, of Vanishing Point, a novel in verse by Jeri Kroll, novelist and poet from Australia, adapted for the stage and directed by Leslie Jacobson, on Monday, Sept. 5th, at 1 p.m. on the Millennium Stage (South). Read on for more: Continue reading