Archive | February, 2011

One Week to Win the Strasser (Cash) Prize

28 Feb

This is the final week to submit your best work to win the Strasser Prize.  It’s super easy to enter (hey, you’ve already done all the work!), all that’s left for you to do is pick your category and email your entry!

Category: Academic Writing
Includes research papers, essays, analysis, commentary
Top Prize: $100
Runner-up: $50

Category: Creative
Includes all creative writing pieces, such as short stories and poems.
Top Prize: $100
Runner-up: $50

Category:  UW20
Includes only papers from your Origins class in Fall 2010
Top Prize: $100
Runner-up: $50

The Rules, How to Enter, and Deadline
The rules governing the competition are as follows:  The student must be a member of the Honors Program; the paper must have been submitted for a grade during the last year as defined above; and the student may review and further edit the returned and graded paper prior to submission.

A written work may be entered in to only one category.  Students are welcome to enter unique works into all three categories.

The paper must be submitted electronically in MS Word or PDF format to uhp@gwu.edu.  Please include in the e-mail with your attached submission: your name, your year, the class in which you originally submitted the paper, and the paper’s category (Academic, Creative, UW20).

Deadline for entries is Friday, March 4.

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Honors Freshmen to be Housed in Thurston [Again!]

25 Feb
Thurston

This year was a first for freshmen UHPers living in Honors Housing: they’re in Thurston.  Our community housing got moved from Lafayette Hall due to renovations and set in Thurston instead.

Despite concerns in The Hatchet and around campus, UHP housing in Thurston was a great success (as we predicted).

So great, in fact, that we’re set for another year of it.  That’s right, for the second year in a row, next year’s UHP Freshmen will have the option to live in Honors Housing in Thurston Hall!

Science Can Answer Moral Questions [Good Video]

25 Feb

If you’re not yet convinced that understanding science is a moral imperative, today’s video might just push you over the edge.  Be warned though — it’s pretty provocative.  I’d love to hear any UHP thoughts in the comments: can science answer moral questions?

Questions of good and evil, right and wrong are commonly thought unanswerable by science. But Sam Harris argues that science can — and should — be an authority on moral issues, shaping human values and setting out what constitutes a good life.

Two Haiti events at GW on Fri, March 4 by CANCELLED

24 Feb

The Culture in Global Affairs program, the Global Gender Initiative, and the University Seminar in Performance are sponsoring two Haiti-related events on Friday, March 4. Gina Ulysse will conduct a performance workshop for students at 3pm and will perform in the evening at 6:30pm. Details are provided below. Gina Athena Ulysse is associate professor of anthropology, African studies, environmental studies, and feminist studies at Wesleyan University.

Alter(ed)natives CANCELLED

When: Friday, March 4, 3:00-4:30pm

Where: 1957 E Street NW, 6th floor, Lindner Family Commons

The Elliott School of International Affairs

The George Washington University

Free and open to the public. Please RSVP here

Professor Ulysse explores the border zones between ethnography and performance, and discusses as she puts it, “why we need the visceral in the structural” to participate in the decolonizing project of accessing and reclaiming a full subject. Professor Ulysse is currently working on a montage ethnography, C’est Mon Devoir (It is My Duty): Stories of Civic Engagement, Urban Degradation and the Earthquake in Haiti.

Because When God is Too Busy: Haiti, Me and THE WORLD . CANCELLED

When: Friday, March 4, 6:30-7:30pm

Where: 1957 E Street NW, 6th floor, Lindner Family Commons

The Elliott School of International Affairs

The George Washington University

Free and open to the public. Please RSVP here

Professor Ulysse’s training as a cultural anthropologist informs this dramatic monologue about how Haiti’s past occupies its present. She weaves history, personal narrative, theory, and statistics in spoken-word with Vodou chants to reflect and deconstruct childhood memories, social (in)justice, spirituality, and the dehumanization of Haitians.

CIGA and GGI are part of the Elliott School of International Affairs and its Institute of Global and International Studies

How to Fix the “Declare a Major” Hold for Freshmen

24 Feb

Here's how to kick that hold

Freshmen in CCAS — some of you may soon be getting an email from CCAS saying something along the lines of:

We have put a hold on your account because you have yet to declare a major.  Stop.  Proceed to a major declaration.  Proceed directly to a major declaration. Do not pass Go, do not collect $200.

Here’s how to get rid of that hold:

It’s a common problem for our earnest and high-achieving Honors students.  You have “too many” credit hours for a freshman, so the system (i.e. robots) thinks you’re a sophomore and need to declare a major.  But you don’t!  It’s a pain, but all you have to do is visit the CCAS office at Phillips 107 to explain and ask to have the hold lifted. Unfortunately we don’t have the power in our office.

We recommend doing this as soon as you receive notification that a hold has been placed on your account.